Mixed Year Group Classes – Information for Parents

 

What is a mixed year group class?

A mixed year group class is a class made of two different year groups within one Key Stage. For example – mixed year 1 and 2 class.

 

Why are mixed year group classes formed?

In 2014, the school agreed to increase their planned admission number from 30 to 45 to cater for the increasing demand of parents’ wishes for their children to be admitted to the school. This means that, from 2014 there has been 45 children in each year group. Obviously, it is not possible to have 45 children in one class due to space and for the educational well being of the children. To resolve this the school has to form some classes with mixed years.

 

What are the organisational arrangements for mixed year group classes?

In September 2018 the class structure of Key Stage 1 and 2 is as follows:

Class 1 – 30 Year 1 children

Class 2 – 15 Year 1 children and 15 Year 2 children

Class 3 – 30 Year 2 children

Class 4 – 30 Year 3 children

Class 5 – 15 Year 3 children and 15 Year 4 children

Class 6 – 30 Year 4 children

Class 7 – 30 Year 5 children

Class 8 – 30 Year 6 children

 

Classes are formed in order of the children’s dates of birth.  Studies and research has shown positive results for mixed year group classes organised by date of birth. Sacred Heart’s previous mixed year group classes (also organised by date of birth) have, on average, achieved significantly higher results in reading, writing and maths than other Manchester schools and other schools Nationally.

 

Will my child be held back if he/she is placed in a mixed  year group class?

No. The way in which learning and teaching are organised in primary schools means that teaching and tasks are personalised to the needs and current achievement levels of individual pupils. The teachers at Sacred Heart are experienced at planning and delivering work to match the needs of all learners. They provide challenge for the more able children and support for those needing more help whichever class they are in, whether it be a mixed year group or not.

The achievement and attainment of children at Sacred Heart School is above the Manchester average in all subjects and in line and above the National average in all subjects. This is testament to the quality of learning and teaching of straight year classes and mixed year classes.

There is absolutely no evidence to suggest that being in a mixed year group class has any detrimental effect whatsoever on the education of children in that class.

 

I am concerned that my child’s friendship grouping may be broken if he/she is in a mixed year group class.

In general terms, it is likely to be good for children to experience classes with different classmates so that their circle of friends and acquaintances can be extended. Opportunities are created beyond the standard curriculum for pupils to maintain contact with friends and will always share social opportunities such as lunchtimes, playtimes, school performances and other activities.

When children transfer to secondary school, new friendship grouping in different subject areas become a fact of life and this situation is generally welcomed by many children.